Adani’s $12bn Carmichael project hit with yet another lawsuit

Indian mining giant Adani is facing another court battle over its plans to build its $12bn (A$16.5bn) Carmichael coal and rail project mine in Australia, which is set to be the country’s biggest coal mine.

Now the company is facing an appeal to the Queensland’s government decision earlier this month to grant Adani all the necessary licences to begin construction.

The Land Services of Coast and Country filed the judicial review Wednesday in the Supreme Court of Queensland, claiming the state’s environment department failed to ensure the proposed mine was an ecologically sustainable development, as outlined in the Environmental Protection Act.

Adani has said legal costs and cutting its way through the environmental hurdles had so far cost it $120 million.

Two weeks ago, a group representing the indigenous people Wangan and Jagalingou (W&J), traditional owners of the land where the project would be built, also challenged in court the leases issued by the Queensland government.

At this point, some are beginning to wonder whether the mega mine and rail project will ever be built.

Since first proposed, Carmichael has faced relentless opposition from organizations ranging from the United Nations to green groups fighting new coal projects, which has scared banks from lending to the project.

In August last year, a federal court had revoked the actual approval, citing environmental concerns.

But the project was later approved by the Australian government, under what environment minister Greg Hunt called “the strictest conditions in Australian history."

Adani has said legal costs and cutting its way through the environmental hurdles had so far cost it $120 million.

According to official estimations, Carmichael will contribute $2.97bn each year to Queensland’s economy and has the potential to create 6,400 new jobs: around 2,500 construction positions and 3,900 operational posts.

Adani’s $12bn Carmichael project hit with yet another lawsuit

Galilee Basin coal export projects map. (Courtesy of GalileeBasin.org)