English schoolboys dig up rare 4,300-year-old gold hair ornament

English schoolboys dig up rare 4,300-year-old gold hair ornament

The children, aged from seven to 10, were taking part in a dig.

Most archaeologists spend years digging through dirt just to find one piece of buried treasure, if any. But it only took a group of four schoolboys from North East England a single morning to unearth a precious golden hair tress dating back to 2,300BC.

The children, aged from seven to 10, were taking part in a dig at Kirkhaugh, Northumberland, when they caught a glimpse of something glinting in the soil, The CWHerald reports.

The 4,300-year-old hair ornament is said to be one of the earliest metal objects to be found in the UK and may have been worn by a metal worker in search of gold and copper.

The piece was found in a burial mound alongside three flint arrowheads and a jet button.

English schoolboys dig up rare 4,300-year-old gold hair ornament

It’s not certain how these kinds of adornments were meant to be worn. Called tress rings, they may have been hair tresses, worn wrapped around a braid or lock of hair, according to The History blog.

They’ve also been labeled “basket earrings” (because they look like the kind of curved edge basket ladies in period movies use to collect flowers from a garden) and may have been worn with the tab inserted into a piercing and then wrapped around the outside of the semi-cylinder. They would have hugged the outside of the ear like modern ear cuffs do.

Only ten finds like this have ever been made in the UK, and this one found by the boys is the partner of a matching one discovered at Kirkhaugh during an excavation in 1935.

Images: Screenshots from ITV.com