Exhibition of Diavik-mined giant, uncut Foxfire diamond extended

The stone has been enjoying a marquee run at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C.

The now legendary Foxfire diamond, a 187.6-carat rare stone found in 2015 at Canada’s Diavik mine buried in an area where big gem-quality diamonds aren't supposed to exist, will remain on display at one of the US’ the most popular museum until April 2.

The stone — the largest uncut, gem-quality diamond ever mined in North America — has been enjoying a marquee run at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington D.C., since it went on display late last year.

Exhibition of Diavik-mined giant, uncut Foxfire diamond extended a week

It was unearthed in 2015 at the Diavik mine, operated by Rio Tinto, in one of the most remote corners of the world — about 210 km from the North Pole in the Barren Lands of Canada's Northwest Territories. (Image: Foxfirediamond.com)

Found buried deep beneath a frozen lake in Canada’s North West Territories, the stone was saved from certain destruction only because of its unusual flattened shape.

The two-billion-year-old diamond is considered the rarest of its kind, due to the singular way it was found, its extraordinary quality and remarkable size. In addition, the Foxfire shows still another remarkable trait, rarely seen in nature — it’s able to cast a singular glow that causes it to appear to actually emit light.

Exhibition of Diavik-mined giant, uncut Foxfire diamond extended a week

The Foxfire was purchased at auction by investor Deepak Sheth in June last year, and went on public display for the first time in November, alongside the famous Hope diamond. (Image courtesy of Amadena Investments)

“It really is a miracle that it was found,’’ said at the time of its discovery Alan Davies, chief executive officer of diamonds and minerals for Rio Tinto, the operator of Diavik mine, the stone’s former home. “It’s a rare find, a really rare find.”

Foxfire gets its name from aboriginal descriptions of the northern lights as a flickering foxtail. It was purchased at auction by investor Deepak Sheth in June last year, and went on public display for the first time in November, alongside the famous Hope diamond.

First unveiled in London's Kensington Palace in 2015, the iconic diamond will continue its international tour next month.