Ross Beaty awarded Order of Canada

Pan American Silver founder donated $9 million this year to wildlife conservation

Mining magnate and philanthropist Ross Beaty joins other prominent Canadians in being among those awarded membership in the 2017 Order of Canada.

Established in 1967 by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, the Order of Canada recognizes outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation. The Order recognizes people in all sectors of Canadian society, including achievements in business. Beaty was among 99 named to the Order, including Newfoundland folk singer Alan Doyle, Garry Lindberg for his contributions to the Canadarm and space programs, and Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter.

The award shows that mining and environmentalism are not necessarily incompatible. Beaty, the founder and chairman of Pan American Silver (TSX, NASDSAQ:PAAS) and executive chairman of Alterra Power Corp – a geothermal, wind and hydro power company – is also a generous philanthropist. In May he gave $5 million over 10 years to Panthera, which is a global wild cat conservation organization.

A few month earlier the Canadian Museum of Nature announced that Beaty would be providing it with its largest-ever philanthropic gift: a $4 million investment to enhance the museum’s national research and collections that are focused on species discovery.

The gift was through the Sitka Foundation, which Beaty founded in 2007 to be a catalyst in the protection of the environment and promotion of biodiversity.

“Is there anything more rewarding than saving species from extinction,” Beaty, who lives on Bowen Island, told The Vancouver Courier. “There’s a real bio-diversity crisis right now and most people aren’t even aware of it. This is why we want to support education, as well as science, public policy and land conservation.

“We currently support roughly 75 groups and my focus is to continue to build that. My whole family is supportive of that. My oldest daughter works for the Foundation, and my youngest is about to start her masters in marine biology at UBC. I know she is going to be very important in supporting all of this.”