LOESCHE supplies four vertical roller mills (VRM) for cement plants of Pakistan's second largest producer

Farooqia – LOESCHE has now sold four mills comprising one raw mill, one coal mill and two clinker mills to Pakistan. Bestway Cement Company want to use these to modernise their Farooqia cement plant in the Punjab province, 40 km north of the capital, Rawalpindi. One high-performance 4-roller mill VRM with a capacity of 450 t/h is to be used there for the grinding of cement raw  material to a fineness of 12 %  with  sieving  residue  of R 90 μm. Two further LOESCHE mills from the middle performance range and a throughput of 170 t/h will serve for the subsequent grinding of cement clinker to a fineness of 3,200 Blaine. One more large vertical roller mill in modular construction with a capacity of 40 t/h will be used in the grinding of coal to a fineness of 10 % and R 90 μm sieving residue.

A LOESCHE Mill Type LM 56.4 in Nallalingayapalli, India.

LOESCHE's contractual partner and plant constructor is the renowned Sinoma International Engineering Co. from Nanjing, China, specialised in the design of cement plants. Sinoma and LOESCHE have globally been working together successfully for many years. The numerous positive experiences with LOESCHE mills, the competitive price and the fast delivery time of only seven  months  were  decisive  factors  in  Sinoma's  decision  to again choose the grinding plants of the vertical roller mill specialists.

Bestway Cement Limited (BCL), part of the British conglomerate Bestway, acquired the cement plant from Mustekham Cement Limited (MCI) in 2005 as part of a government privatisation programme and today produces 1.12 million metric tonnes of clinker per year there. With a total of four cement plants in the country, producing six million tonnes of cement annually, today BCL is Pakistan's second biggest cement producer and employs over 3,000 people. The privatisation of the formerly state-owned Mustekham Cement Limited and the acquisition by BCL took place at a time when Pakistan's cement demand was rising sharply due to, among other reasons, reconstruction of areas affected by earthquakes.