Seabridge appoints key people to secure social license

Tour at the KSM property. (Image courtesy of Seabridge Gold).

Seabridge Gold (TSX: SEA) (NYSE: SA) announced that it has expanded the responsibilities and scope of its environmental and permitting team in response to the growing importance and complexity of earning and maintaining the social licence to build and operate mining projects in Canada.

In a media statement, Seabridge’s chairman and CEO, Rudi Fronk, said that the switch was made following British Columbia’s decision to legislate the application of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, of which principles have been incorporated into Bill 41 and developed collaboratively by the BC Government and the First Nations Leadership Council.

“We see the new and more complex role of the public sector, citizens groups and Indigenous peoples in resource development as an opportunity” – Seabridge CEO

“We see the new and more complex role of the public sector, citizens groups and Indigenous peoples in resource development as an opportunity to enhance our reputation for transparency and collaborative problem-solving while advancing our projects,” Fronk said.

To work within this new context, key members of Seabridge’s management team were promoted to expanded roles. Brent Murphy was appointed as senior vice-president of environmental affairs, while Elizabeth Fillatre Miller assumes the new position of vice-president of environment and social responsibility, and Jessy Chaplin takes on the job of director of permitting and compliance.

“Our aim is to continue to be a leader in our responsiveness to the environmental and the social needs of our Indigenous partners and stakeholders,” Fronk said.

Seabridge holds a 100% interest in the KSM and Iskut properties located near Stewart, British Columbia, and the Courageous Lake gold project located in Canada’s Northwest Territories.

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