Talga gets funding to develop graphitic anode for solid-state batteries

EV charging station. (Image by NCDOTcommunications, Flickr).

The UK Government’s ISCF Faraday Battery Challenge initiative granted Talga Resources (ASX:TLG) funding to develop a graphitic anode for solid-state batteries. The award was channeled through the miner’s UK subsidiary Talga Technologies.

The project’s goal is to create a new high-capacity graphitic carbon composite anode, called Talnode-E, designed to charge faster and have higher power than existing models. The material is also envisioned to have easier processability, safer handling, highly scalable industrial manufacturing and lower costs. 

While solid-state batteries are theoretically capable of very high performance, in practice, they don’t exceed all of the performance and economic requirements of today’s best Li-ion batteries in EVs

With the funding received, Talga would be able to work on its “Cathodes, anodes, and solid-state electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries” project and get reimbursed for 70% of its eligible costs, including salaries, consumables, equipment and contractor expenses. 

According to the Australian company, the idea came about after its innovation team realized that while solid-state batteries are theoretically capable of very high performance, in practice, they don’t exceed all of the performance and economic requirements of today’s best Li-ion batteries in EVs. 

“A major bottleneck of solid-state development is the anode, where the use of metallic lithium can cause a range of issues leading to slower charge/discharge characteristics, safety issues both within the battery and in mass production, and higher cost,” the firm said in a media statement.  

In Talga’s view, its proposed Talnode-E can overcome these issues.

Managing Director Mark Thompson said in the media brief that the firm has already attained non-disclosure agreements with leading electronic and automotive companies looking to test its anodes, which will be produced with its 100%-owned Swedish graphite supply.

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